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Noticeboard

CORONAVIRUS

The NHS and Public Health England (PHE) are extremely well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal.

 

The risk to the general public is moderate. If you have arrived back to the UK from mainland China, Thailand, Japan, Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia or Macau within 14 days, follow the specific advice for returning travellers.

 

Anyone who has travelled to China or places listed above in the last 14 days and develops symptoms of cough or fever or shortness of breath, should immediately:

 

  • Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people as you would with the flu
  • Call NHS 111 to inform them of your recent travel to the country

 

Information for the public is available at gov.uk/coronavirus

 

Like the common cold, coronavirus infection usually occurs through close contact with a person with novel coronavirus via cough and sneezes or hand contact. A person can also be infected by touching contaminated surfaces if they do not wash their hands.

 

The risk of being in close contact with a person with coronavirus or contaminated surfaces is very low at the current time, as members of the public who have visited Wuhan, Hubei province, China are currently in isolation.

 

Testing of suspected coronavirus cases is carried out in line with strict regulations. This means that suspected cases are kept in isolation, away from public areas of the hospital and returned home also in isolation. Any equipment that come into contact with suspected cases are thoroughly cleaned as appropriate. Specific guidance has also been shared with NHS staff to help safeguard them and others.  Patients can be reassured that their safety is a top priority, and are encouraged to attend all appointments as usual.

 

Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

 

  • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze. Then bin the tissue, and wash your hands, or use a sanitiser gel.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after using public transport. Use a sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are unwell.

 

You can find the latest information and advice from Public Health England at www.gov.uk/coronavirus

We would like your views about the Practice. We are asking if patients would like to give their email address so we can contact you every now and again to ask some questions. Your contact details will only be used for this purpose and will be kept safely.

If you would like to be involved please print and complete this form and return to reception at any site.

Patient Participation Group

From 15th January 2020, our Heatherside site will be open on a Wednesday afternoon until 6pm on a temporary basis

When should I go to A&E?

choose well logocwThere are over 21 million attendances at accident and emergency (A&E) departments each year, many of which are not appropriate.

Due to the rising demand and pressures at A&E departments, Park Road Surgery are working with Surrey Heath CCG to try to reduce unnecessary attendances 

A&E departments assess and treat patients with serious injuries or illnesses. Generally, you should only visit A&E or call 999 for life-threatening emergencies, such as:

  • loss of consciousness
  • acute confused state and fits that are not stopping
  • persistent, severe chest pain
  • breathing difficulties
  • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped

 

If it is not an immediate emergency call NHS 111 The service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and can provide medical advice and advise you on the best local service to offer the care you need.

Less severe injuries can be treated in minor injuries services and NHS walk-in centres, which can treat patients without an appointment.

For illnesses that are not life threatening you should first contact your GP Outside of normal surgery hours you can still phone your GP, but you will usually be directed to an out-of-hours service. The out-of-hours period is from 8pm to 8am on weekdays, and all day at weekends and on bank holidays. During out-of-hours periods you can also call NHS 111



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website